Monday, 24 April 2017

Fashion Revolution

April 24th - 30th April is Fashion Revolution week. If you aren't a follower of the Fashion Revolution campaign, there isn't a better time to find out and get involved.



Why should I care?


Today is the fourth anniversary of the Rana Plaza collapse. 1,138 people died in an unstable building that collapsed in Bangladesh. The building consisted of five garment factories, making stock for many of the brands we see on every high-street and in every shopping centre. Over a thousand people died while making our clothes.

As we remember this disaster that happened only four years ago, we also have to consider what other issues cheap, fast fashion creates globally. Many of the garment workers who make our clothes are not paid fairly, work unhealthy amounts of hours and are not given fair workers rights or social insurance. The majority of the people who make our clothes are young women (some are children), who experience harassment and abuse from their employers. We know that this is not okay.

Not only does the fast fashion industry abuse the vulnerable people who create our garments, but it abuses our planet too. Fashion is one of the dirtiest industries on the planet, and it's not surprising given how much and how rapidly we consume. The fashion industry needs toxic chemicals to survive, and is responsible for 3% of global CO2 emissions. Annually, 350,000 tons of clothing goes to landfill in the UK alone.

What can I do to help?


Fashion Revolution is a campaign that calls for more transparency from the fashion industry. If we require brands to be transparent, we require them to be responsible. How can we, as consumers, make the right choices when brands will do just about anything to cover up their evils?

The quickest, easiest thing to do today is to ask brands #whomademyclothes?



Throughout this Fashion Revolution week, we can help by joining the revolution in seven ways. Check out their website and social media to get an idea of what you can do to help. On my own blog, I will be demanding transparency from brands, and sharing ways I shop more ethically and extend the life of clothing. Below, I'm also linking some of my favourite bloggers that promote ethical, fair clothing and call for a transparent and responsible fashion industry.

Please get involved today, and we can make the world a better place.

Resources:
Fashion Revolution
War on Want
The True Cost (documentary)
Ethical Fashion Forum
Centre for Sustainable Fashion

Posts:
Why Fast Fashion is a Feminist Issue

Revolutionary Blogs:
Tolly Dolly Posh
Tartan Brunette
Trashed Vintage
Eleanor Claudie
Kristen Leo
Cruelty-free Becky
Not So Quiet Grrl
Soph's Choices
Another Story For Tomorrow

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